On This Day in Space! April 30, 2015: MESSENGER spacecraft crashes into Mercury

MESSENGER was the very first spacecraft to orbit Mercury and the 2nd spacecraft to study it up close after NASAs Mariner 10 zipped the world in the 1970s. MESSENGER invested four years orbiting Mercury. During that time, it mapped the surface area of Mercury in unmatched information..
The objective found water ice and organic compounds around Mercurys north pole. It likewise found that Mercury has a strange offset magnetic field that doesnt line up with its axis of rotation..

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On April 30, 2015, NASAs MESSENGER objective to Mercury pertained to an end when the spacecraft deliberately crashed into the surface of the little, rocky planet..

MESSENGER was the very first spacecraft to orbit Mercury and the second spacecraft to study it up close after NASAs Mariner 10 flew by the planet in the 1970s. MESSENGER invested four years orbiting Mercury. A tale of resourcefulness, experience and heroism, learn of the area agencys greatest accomplishments and how– over six years– the organization has consistently and tirelessly dedicated itself to its starting principle: that “activities in area need to be dedicated to serene purposes for the advantage of all humankind”.

Discover the story of how and why NASA was produced, its biggest triumphs, darkest days, and of the times it surpassed all possible hopes. A tale of adventure, resourcefulness and heroism, find out of the space firms biggest achievements and how– over 6 years– the organization has consistently and tirelessly dedicated itself to its founding principle: that “activities in space must be dedicated to peaceful purposes for the benefit of all humankind”. View Deal.

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The objective was only expected to last one year, however NASA extended it two times so it might continue its cutting-edge observations of Mercury. It eventually ran out of fuel, so NASA purposefully crashed it into Mercury, where it created a brand-new crater.